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Corita Kent

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Corita Kent (November 20, 1918 – September 18, 1986), born Frances Elizabeth Kent and also known as Sister Mary Corita Kent, was an American Roman Catholic religious sister, artist, designer and educator. Key themes in her work included Christianity, and social justice. She was also a teacher at the Immaculate Heart College.When she became 18 years of age she entered a religious order and became a nun. She was the head of the art department at Immaculate heart college. Where she also taught a wide variety of different painting styles. Her artwork contained her own spiritual expression and love for her God.
Sister Corita Kent’s primary medium was silk screen, also known as Serigraphy. Her innovative methods pushed back the limitations of two-dimensional mediums of the times. Kent’s emphasis on printing was partially due to her wish for democratic outreach, as she wished for affordable art for the masses. Her artwork, with its messages of love and peace, was particularly popular during the social upheavals of the 1960s and 1970s. After a cancer diagnosis in the early 1970s, she entered an extremely prolific period in her career, including the Rainbow Swash design on the LNG storage tank in Boston, and the 1985 version of the United States Postal Service’s special Love stamp.In recent years, Corita has gained increased recognition for her role in the pop art movement. Critics and theorists previously failed to count her work as part of any mainstream “canon,” but in the last few years there has been a resurgence of attention given to Kent. As both a nun and a woman making art in the twentieth century, she was in many ways cast to the margins of the different movements she was a part of.
Corita’s art was her activism, and her spiritually-informed social commentary promoted love and tolerance.